Lessons Learned From My Parents

My mom and dad are inspiring and amazing people. They have hearts of gold, they are generous, and they have never left me wanting for love of affection. They are strong, and put family first. This is just the tip of the iceberg; they have tons of wonderful qualities, the vast majority of which I feel grateful to have in my genepool. However, they share one major flaw: they lack financial common sense.

My mom, an accountant by trade, doesn’t have a taste for fancy things. She lives for family, her cat, the L.L. Bean catalog, and the slightly more than occasional meal out. My dad also likes to eat out, attend sporting events, travel locally, and smoke a cigar here and there. They don’t have extravagant tastes, so what gives with their finances?

They have done a spectacular job of living beyond their means over the past 30 or so years. Whether it was living in a house that was a little bit beyond their budget, buying the car that was just a little more expensive than their last one, or eating out when they had a fridge full of groceries, they kept making the wrong financial moves, be them big or small. Couple these habits with repeatedly changing or losing jobs, unexpected illness, stagnant incomes, and a recently crashed real estate market, and you’ve got the perfect storm for fiscal crisis.

Now that my parents are approaching retirement age, these issues are more pressing than ever before. They’re paying the price of living beyond their means each day. 

The situation sounds bleak, but I’m retelling it because it’s a story of transformation.  My parents are improving their situation each and every day. They are adapting, changing their their day to day habits to keep their budget in mind. They are living in a home they can afford and drive cars that are in their budget. They even have a property that they’ve begun renting out for a profit. Each day is a fresh start, and I am proud of my parents for turning over a new financial leaf.

Remember, it’s never too late to make a fresh start for yourself and your bank account. If my parents can do it as they approach retirement, you can in your 20’s, 30’s or 40’s. Commit yourself to making your finances change and it will happen!

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